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The rush to build wind farms to combat climate change is colliding with preservation of one of the U.S. West’s most spectacular predators, the golden eagle. Scientists say the species is teetering on the edge of decline and worry that proliferating wind turbines could push them over the brink. Golden eagle wingspans can reach seven feet — ideal for floating on thermal drafts as they search for their prey. But it also puts them in competition for the wind resources energy companies want. U.S. wildlife officials are encouraging companies to enroll in a program that allows them to kill some eagles in exchange for reducing eagle deaths elsewhere.

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The rush to build wind farms to combat climate change is colliding with preservation of one of the U.S. West’s most spectacular predators, the golden eagle. Scientists say the species is teetering on the edge of decline and worry that proliferating wind turbines could push them over the brink. Golden eagle wingspans can reach 7 feet — ideal for floating on thermal drafts as they search for their prey. But it also puts them in competition for the wind resources energy companies want. U.S. wildlife officials are encouraging companies to enroll in a program that allows them to kill some eagles in exchange for reducing eagle deaths elsewhere.

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The world’s two biggest emitters of greenhouse gases are sparring on Twitter over climate policy, with China asking if the U.S. can deliver on the landmark climate legislation signed into law by President Joe Biden this week. U.S. Ambassador to China Nicholas Burns took to Twitter to say the U.S. was acting on climate change with its largest investment ever — and that China should follow. China’s Foreign Ministry responded with its own tweet: “Good to hear. But what matters is: Can the U.S. deliver?” The exchange is emblematic of a broader worry. U.S.-China cooperation is considered vital to the success of global climate efforts. With the breakdown in relations, some question whether the two sides can cooperate.

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Climate scientists are warning of dire consequences for the Mediterranean Sea's marine life as it burns up in a series of severe heat waves. Scientists say they are witnessing exceptional temperature hikes ranging from 3 degrees Celsius (5.4 Fahrenheit) to 5 degrees Celsius (9 Fahrenheit) above the norm for this time of year. Marine heat waves are caused by ocean currents building up areas of warm water. Weather systems and heat in the atmosphere can also pile on degrees to the water’s temperature. Marine heat waves are longer and more frequent and more intense because of human-induced climate change.

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President Joe Biden has signed Democrats’ landmark climate change and health care bill. It's the “final piece” of the president's pared-down domestic agenda as he aims to boost his party’s standing with voters ahead of midterm elections. Biden says, “The American people won, and the special interests lost.” The legislation includes the biggest federal investment ever to fight climate change — some $375 billion over a decade. It also caps prescription drug costs at $2,000 out-of-pocket annually for Medicare recipients, and helps an estimated 13 million Americans pay for health care insurance by extending subsidies provided during the coronavirus pandemic.

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President Joe Biden arrived at the White House promising to “build back” America, and now he has signed into law legislation with a slimmer version of that idea. It includes the biggest U.S. investment ever to fight climate change, a $2,000 out-of-pocket cap on prescription drug costs for people in the Medicare program and a new corporate minimum tax to ensure big businesses pay their share. And billions will be leftover to pay down federal deficits. All told, the Democrats’ “Inflation Reduction Act” may not do much to immediately tame inflationary prices hikes.

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Boston is seeking to ban fossil fuels from new building projects and major renovations. Democratic Mayor Michelle Wu announced Tuesday that the city will take advantage of a key provision in the climate change bill passed into law this month by Gov. Charlie Baker. The new legislation creates a pilot project allowing 10 Massachusetts cities and towns to require certain new building projects be all-electric. City officials say fossil fuel use in buildings represent more than one-third of Boston's greenhouse gas emissions. New York, Washington, D.C., and Seattle are among the U.S. municipalities that have imposed similar bans.

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The Columbia River, which natives call Nch’i-Wána, or “the great river,” has sustained Indigenous people in the region for millennia. The river’s salmon and the roots and berries that grow around the area, are known as “first foods” because of the belief that they volunteered to sacrifice themselves for the benefit of humans at the time of Creation. These foods are prominently featured in longhouse ceremonies and rituals. The foods and the river are still threatened by industrialization, climate change and pollution. Many Indigenous people still live along the river because their blood lines are here and the practice of their faith requires them to do so.

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The Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest, which Natives call  Nch’i-Wána, or “the great river,” has sustained Indigenous people in the region for millennia. The river's salmon and the roots and berries that grow around the area, are known as “first foods" because of the belief that they volunteered to sacrifice themselves for the benefit of humans at the time of Creation. These foods are prominently featured in longhouse ceremonies and rituals. The foods and the river are still threatened by industrialization, climate change and pollution. Many Indigenous people still live along the river because their blood lines are there and the practice of their faith requires them to do so.

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A project in the country's top coal-producing area seeks to pump the carbon dioxide produced by burning that coal back underground. The project is one of dozens nationwide that stand to get a big boost from tax credits in the new climate bill plus a share of $2.5 billion in funding for carbon capture and storage in last year's infrastructure bill. It's also part of Wyoming's vision of becoming a center for carbon capture and storage. The work near the Dry Fork Station power plant outside Gillette so far involves drilling two injection wells nearly two miles underground. Proponents of carbon storage say the technology is straightforward but others are skeptical it can ever be done economically.

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Seven Western U.S. states face a deadline from the federal government to come up with a plan to use substantially less Colorado River water in 2023. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is expected to publish hydrology projections on Tuesday that will trigger agreed-upon cuts for states relying on the river. States face the threat of proposing additional cuts or having them mandated by the federal government. Prolonged drought, climate change and overuse are jeopardizing the water supply that more than 40 million people rely on. States acknowledge painful cuts are needed, but are stubbornly clinging to the water they were allocated a century ago.

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Americans are less concerned now about how climate change might impact them personally — and about how their personal choices affect the climate than they were three years ago. That's according to a June poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that shows a wide majority still believe climate change is happening. Many climate scientists told the Associated Press that those shifts are concerning but not surprising given that individuals are feeling overwhelmed by a range of issues, which now include an economy plagued by inflation after more than two years of a pandemic. In addition to being outpaced by other issues, climate change or the environment are mentioned as priorities by fewer Americans now than just a few years ago, according to the poll.

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The impacts of climate change have been felt throughout the Northeastern U.S. with rising sea levels, heavy precipitation and storm surges causing flooding and coastal erosion. This summer has brought another extreme: a severe drought that has made lawns crispy and has farmers begging for steady rain. The heavy, short rainfall brought by the occasional thunderstorm tends to run off, not soak into the ground. Water supplies are low or dry. Many communities are restricting nonessential outdoor water use. Fire departments are combatting more brush fires and crops are growing poorly. Farmers in the region say this summer's harsh weather has made their jobs more challenging.

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A major economic bill headed to the president has “game-changing” incentives for the nuclear energy industry, experts say, and those tax credits are even more substantial if a facility is sited in a community with a coal plant that's closing. Among the many things the transformative bill could do, nuclear energy experts say, is spur more nuclear reactor projects like one Bill Gates is planning in Kemmerer, Wyoming. Companies designing and building the next generation of nuclear reactors could pick one of two new tax credits available to carbon-free electricity generators. Both include a 10-percentage point bonus for facilities sited in fossil fuel communities.

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The biggest investment ever in the U.S. to fight climate change. A hard-fought cap on out-of-pocket prescription drug costs for people in the Medicare program. A new corporate minimum tax to ensure big businesses pay their share. And billions leftover to pay down federal deficits. All told, the Democrats’ “Inflation Reduction Act” may not do much to immediately tame inflationary price hikes. But the package approved by Congress and headed to the White House for President Joe Biden’s signature will touch countless American lives with longtime party proposals. Here's a look at what's in the estimated $740 billion economic package.

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Democrats have pushed their landmark climate and health care bill through Congress, handing an election-year victory to President Joe Biden. The House approved the bill over solid Republican opposition Friday, five days after the Senate did the same. The vote means a win for Biden that until late July seemed out of reach. The package is much smaller than Biden's original environment and social legislation that failed in Congress last year. But after long, bitter talks, Democrats agreed to a smaller but still substantive compromise. It includes Washington's biggest ever effort on climate change, pharmaceutical price curbs and tax boosts on big corporations, long-held party goals.

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America sizzled through some hot nights last month, enough to make history. Federal meteorologists say the Lower 48 states in July set a record for overnight warmth. The average overnight temperature for the continental United States in July was 63.6 degrees, which is the highest in 128 years of recordkeeping. This matters because cooler temperatures overnight are crucial for people, animals and plants to recover from the warmth of daytime heat waves. In the U.S., the nighttime is warming faster than the daytime. Climate scientists say that's a signature of human-caused global warming.

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A federal judge has reinstated a moratorium on coal leasing from federal lands that was imposed under former President Barack Obama and then scuttled under former President Donald Trump. Friday’s ruling from U.S. District Judge Brian Morris requires government officials to complete a new environmental review of the leasing program before they can resume coal sales. Few leases were sold in recent years as coal demand shrank drastically, but coal from existing leases remains a major contributor of planet-warming emissions. The industry’s opponents had urged Morris to revive the Obama-era moratorium to ensure coal can’t make a comeback as wildfires, drought, rising sea levels and other effects of climate change worsen.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom is proposing to extend the life of the state’s last operating nuclear power plant by at least five to 10 years to maintain reliable power supplies in the climate change era. A draft bill obtained Friday by The Associated Press said the plan would allow the plant to continue operating beyond a scheduled closing by 2025. The draft proposal also includes a possible loan for operator Pacific Gas & Electric for up to $1.4 billion. The proposal was confirmed by Newsom spokesman Anthony York. The draft was obtained ahead of a California Energy Commission meeting on the state’s energy needs.

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